Creation and Science

The Kingfisher Effect

When Japan’s Sanyo Shinkansen “bullet train” was first put in service, residents along the train line complained about the noise level. About half the line was made up of tunnel sections, and the train would produce a tunnel boom on exiting due to the sudden change in air resistance.

The engineers pondered the problem until one of them remembered having read about a bird with a unique design feature, the kingfisher. To catch its prey, the kingfisher dives from the air, which has low resistance, into high-resistance water—and it only creates the smallest splash upon entry. The engineer surmised that this was due to the shape of the kingfisher’s beak being perfectly suited to deal with such changes in resistance.

Are Science and Faith Compatible?

“It is increasingly clear to modern science that the universe was exquisitely fine-tuned to enable human life. We are somehow critically involved in [God’s] purpose.

Our job is to sense that purpose as best we can, love one another, and help Him get that job done.”

—Richard Smalley (1943–2005), awarded the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery of fullerenes, the third elemental form of carbon. Smalley is considered the Father of Nanotechnology.

Something from Nothing

While visiting my dad for his 85th birthday, we watched some of our old family movies. It was funny to see my brother as a one-year-old, crawling around, playing with the puppies, and eating from the dog’s food dish. To think that this cute little baby would grow up to be a distinguished college professor and international lecturer! It got me thinking about how God makes special people out of nobodies. We come into this world naked and helpless, and God transforms us into the unique people we each are through our experiences and choices.

It’s been said that God delights in making something out of nothing, and I believe it. In fact, I believe that God made everything out of nothing.

The Spark of Life

“Abiogenesis” is a term that was apparently coined by Thomas Huxley in the 1860s. Commonly referred to as “Darwin’s bulldog” for his aggressive promotion of Darwin’s theory of evolution, Huxley attempted to patch the most obvious and fundamental hole in the theory by stating that life arose from non-life—that it was the result of the process of abiogenesis—in the long-distant past of the earth’s primeval existence by some natural reaction that was possible then but impossible now.

It’s What You Choose to Believe

Question: How did the universe and all that is in it come into existence? Did some inexplicable event set off the process or was it the work of an intelligent designer?

The two sides of the debate

True science is based on what is known as the “scientific method,” by which knowledge is advanced by formulating a question, collecting data about it through observation and experiment, and testing a hypothetical answer. Only after such experimentation has proven a scientific theory to be true by producing observable and repeatable results does the theory move into the realm of scientific fact.

Darwin’s Missing Links

If life had evolved into its wondrous profusion of creatures little by little, then one would expect to find fossils of transitional creatures which were a bit like what went before them and a bit like what came after. But no one has yet found any evidence of such transitional creatures. This oddity has been attributed to gaps in the fossil record which gradualists expected to fill when rock strata of the proper age had been found. In the last decade, however, geologists have found rock layers of all divisions … and no transitional forms were contained in them.1
—Paleontologist Niles Eldredge

The Great Masters

It had been some years since my husband and I had spent a winter in England, and it was turning out to be a very cold, windy, and damp one. We were in the habit of walking daily for exercise, but the prospect of walking in bone-chilling weather for weeks on end was not a pleasant one. Then one day, while strolling in the city, we came upon a way to escape the cold—a visit to the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square. The more than 2,300 paintings that line the long corridors comprise the largest collection of western European art in the world and are open to the public.

Something from Nothing

While visiting my dad for his 85th birthday, we watched some of our old family movies. It was funny to see my brother as a one-year-old, crawling around, playing with the puppies, and eating from the dog’s food dish. To think that this cute little baby would grow up to be a distinguished college professor and international lecturer! It got me thinking about how God makes special people out of nobodies. We come into this world naked and helpless, and God transforms us into the unique people we each are through our experiences and choices.

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