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The Joyful Heart

As followers of Jesus, “grateful” should be our default setting when we consider that Jesus died to redeem us from an eternity of being separated from God. This should put a spring in our step and cause all the not-so-great stuff to bounce off as irrelevant. But I tend to succumb to less-than-grateful reactions, because, well, traffic, mess, stress, too little of this, too much of that. You know how it goes.

Published in Gratitude

The Eyes of Gratitude

As a child, I had a lazy eye and blurred vision, which made it necessary for me to wear glasses from the time I was seven years old. In order to keep my myopia from worsening, I had strict limits on my reading—no reading at night, and any reading only allowed when sitting at a desk with a bright desk lamp and proper posture. Watching television or movies was something that had to be minimized, along with other eye-straining hobbies, such as painting, sewing, and crafts.

Published in Gratitude

The Gratitude Journal

I can´t remember how to spell that word! How do I express this idea correctly? I can’t seem to get my thoughts onto the paper!

I was seeing how rusty my writing was. I hadn’t had much opportunity to order my thoughts into written paragraphs since my school days, and I was facing the obviously poor consequences. Then I remembered how much I’d enjoyed a creative writing course in college.

Published in Gratitude

Jonathan’s Integrity

I’ve always thought Prince Jonathan, the son of Israel’s first anointed king, is an amazing example in the Bible of honor and integrity. Think about it: he was logically expected to succeed his father, King Saul, as king—but the prophet Samuel anointed the boy David instead.

Now, if I were in Jonathan’s position, I think I would have succumbed in one of two ways. Either I would have become consumed with envy, feeling that I had been dealt an unjust hand. Or I would have not cared about the affairs of the kingdom from then on.

Published in Personal Growth

Finding Our Niche

The great British writer Gilbert Keith Chesterton wrote a series of short stories about a parish priest, Father Brown, with a knack for forensics. This lowly priest investigated criminal cases while maintaining compassion and understanding toward the guilty.

Published in Personal Growth

The Mindset Change

A recent study done by Charles Schwab showed that in the United States, $2.4 million is the number that makes a household feel wealthy, and just over $1 million is what it takes to feel “comfortable.” Sadly, that means that only about 10% of the population in the United States is “comfortable.” And then there’s the rest of us! And regardless of where a household fell on the income spectrum, nearly every household reported “needing” just a little bit more. Never mind the vast majority of the world’s population living in developing countries, where such amounts would be considered vast fortunes accessible only to the wealthiest.

Published in Perspective

Debt Reduction and Wealthbuilding

Reading the blogs of other people fighting debt helps me keep my resolve in focused debt reduction. As I browse articles that relate to where we’re at in our journey out of debt, I often sift out those to do with investments and savings. There is an overlap between writings on the subject of debt reduction and those on the subject of wealth building, and while I’m 100% in when it comes to eliminating debt, I struggle with the concept of building wealth. Where I associate debt reduction with becoming responsible, exercising discipline, and cleaning up my act, I have tended to associate wealth building exclusively with greed and selfishness.

Published in Success

Three Faith-Boosting Lessons

It began one morning when I disagreed with something my wife said. It was during one of those trying patches where you find yourself irritable and finding fault with everyone around. I was about to contribute a sharp retort when I caught myself mid-speech and decided to pray if I should go ahead with it. The answer was an emphatic “No!” It all happened so quickly in my mind, but it set off a chain reaction that ended up bringing new insight.

Published in Prayer

Growth Is Addictive

I’m sure parents the world over share my dread of wrestling with children’s homework and preparing for tests. Calming my teenagers’ anxiety before a test or trying to get them to eat breakfast before a benchmark exam are parenting moments I’ll be more than happy to be done with.

Published in Personal Growth

Navigating the Lows

It’s well known that in fiction, plots along the lines of “Matilda is happy, beautiful, successful, and will live happily-ever-after-forever-and-ever” don’t make the most captivating stories or become bestsellers. Even picture books for children need to involve some kind of tension—an obstacle that the child needs to work through in order to achieve his or her happy ending. Whether it’s a little boy handling his first day of school, or a little girl learning to share her toys, the story isn’t captivating if it starts off perfect. Whereas books that go something like, “Man is falsely accused of a crime he did not commit, is imprisoned for countless years before he finally escapes with the intention of confronting his accusers and clearing his name” pique our interest. We want to know what happens next. We want to find out if things turn out right. We begin to want things for the characters because we’re able to relate to the difficulties they’re experiencing.

Published in Getting Through
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